Geithner And The ‘Privilege’ of Being American

ast week Treasury Secretary Tim Geithner said that the “most fortunate Americans” should pay more in taxes for the “privilege of being an American.” One can debate different ways of balancing the budget. But Mr. Geithner’s argument highlights an unfortunate and very destructive instinct that seems to permeate the Obama administration about the respective roles of citizens and their government. His position has three problems: one philosophical, one empirical, and one logical.

 Once we give up our moral compass of government deriving its powers from the people. we must also give up any empirical compass of how much we must surrender to government. When you begin the argument that being a citizen is a “privilege” for which one should pay ever more, you very quickly find yourself on Friedrich Hayek’s “Road to Serfdom.”

If being governed, or over-governed, is a privilege for America’s citizens, shouldn’t everyone pay for the privilege? Why are more than half of all American workers paying nothing at all in income taxes? And if the issue is the need to “pay more” for our privilege, why should only those making over $250,000 be the ones who pay more? If being an American really is a privilege, then certainly all who are thus privileged should pay something.  Lawrence B. Lindsey – Wall Street Journal – Click To Read More…

Mr. Lindsey, a former Federal Reserve governor and assistant to President George W. Bush for economic policy, is president and CEO of the Lindsey Group.